My Two Census

Formerly the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 US Census, and currently an opinion blog that covers all things political, media, foreign policy, globalization, and culture…but sometimes returning to its census/demographics roots.

Find local Census resources

States and municipalities are launching web sites to provide information about and mobilize citizens to participate in the 2010 Census. The sites are run by local governments or state data centers and provide local jobs, contact info, volunteer opportunities and meeting times.

Many states have already launched sites, and other localities — from Maricopa County, Ariz., to Dallas to Mt. Pleasant, Mich. — also have 2010 Census web sites.

We’ve already written about why Census outreach is such a big deal to cities and states. Both the Census Bureau and local governments seem to be making an effort to develop online portals to educate people. Last month, OhMyGov critiqued the Census Bureau’s site, so now, we ask you, readers: What do you think of the web site your state or city has developed?

After the jump, check out a full list of the states we found with Census sites already set up. Leave any others you’ve found — states, counties or cities — in the comments.

Alaska: http://labor.alaska.gov/research/census/cen2010.htm
Arizona: http://www.azcommerce.com/Census.htm
California: http://www.census.ca.gov and http://www.californiacompletecount.org
Colorado: http://dola.colorado.gov/dlg/demog/census2010/census_2010.html
Connecticut: http://www.ct.gov/census2010/site/default.asp
Delaware: http://omb.delaware.gov/2010census
Florida: http://www.sunshinecensus2010.com
Georgia: http://www.census.georgia.gov
Hawaii: http://hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/census/Hawaii_Census_2010
Illinois: http://www2.illinois.gov/census/Pages/default.aspx
Indiana: http://www.census.indiana.edu
Kansas: http://www.ipsr.ku.edu/ksdata/census/2010/index.shtml
Kentucky: http://ksdc.louisville.edu/2010census
Maine: http://www.maine.gov/spo/economics/census2010/index.htm
Maryland: http://www.census.state.md.us
Massachusetts: http://www.sec.state.ma.us/census/index.htm
Michigan: http://www.michigan.gov/census2010
Minnesota: http://www.mn2010census.org
Mississippi: http://www.governorbarbour.com/features/census2010.html
Missouri: http://oa.mo.gov/mocensus
Montana: http://ceic.mt.gov/2010_Web/index.asp
Nebraska: http://www.unomaha.edu/cpar/census2010.php
New Jersey: http://lwd.dol.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/census/2010/njcensus_index.html
New York: http://www.empire.state.ny.us/nysdc/Census_2010
North Carolina: http://www.osbm.state.nc.us/ncosbm/facts_and_figures/census/nc2010
Ohio: http://census.ohio.gov
Pennsylvania: http://www.pacensus2010.org
South Carolina: http://www.census.sc.gov
South Dakota: http://dol.sd.gov/lmic/lbartmay09_census_2010.aspx
Vermont: http://crs.uvm.edu/census/activities.cfm

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4 Responses to “Find local Census resources”

  1. Michael Sponhour Says:

    South Carolina has a census website – http://www.census.sc.gov

    Our Spanish language site will launch very soon at http://censo2010.sc.gov/

  2. Emily Babay Says:

    Thanks, Michael. South Carolina has been added to the list.

  3. Kristin Burnett Says:

    Thanks for this list. It is a good resource. I found this site for Iowa: http://www.iowadatacenter.org/2010census

  4. Lorna Says:

    I thought someone should know that many of my friends who live in Cascade part of Valley County,Idaho have yet to receive their 2010 Census Forms in the US mail. It is very rural and it will take a US Census worker days to hand count them.

    also I was wondering why the US Census never accounted for disabled
    people living in the community. In my neighborhood Im sure federal ADA money was used to make wheelchair cutouts at corners on the sidewalk but they were placed such that nooone in a wheelchair can safely use them.
    Also I and most of my wheelchair friends have no public transportation because the local leaders choose to not fund a single bus within a mile of any of us. I had hoped that the 2010 Census would show that many wheelchair bound people live in what would be considered suburban Idaho and have no access of public transportation.
    I wanted someone ton know.