My Two Census

Formerly the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 US Census, and currently an opinion blog that covers all things political, media, foreign policy, globalization, and culture…but sometimes returning to its census/demographics roots.

Mississippi feels that the Census Bureau “dropped the ball” on the 2010 headcount

Here’s the article.

Tags: , , , , ,

6 Responses to “Mississippi feels that the Census Bureau “dropped the ball” on the 2010 headcount”

  1. Anonymous Says:

    Correction: one editorial in Mississippi feels like blaming someone else for something the people of Mississippi didn’t do months ago…mail in their forms.

  2. enumerator Says:

    Many people did not receive forms in the mail. Many households were not visited in the NRFU operation.

  3. Enumeratrix Says:

    There has been plenty of ball dropping in the 2010 Census. From community leaders and clergy to editorial boards, a great deal more could have been done to explain the purposes of the Census and the importance of the data gathered. The Bureau may have committed the first fumble, but the informed and aware citizens among us surely had some responsibility for recovering the ball and getting on with the game. Census 2010 has been one of the most poorly understood and executed government operations in years, but we could all have done a better job of getting the word out so the work could be done.

  4. Pablo S. Says:

    An undercount in a red state can benefit the party responsible for The Census.

  5. DairylandCL Says:

    (Pablo S. Says:

    June 30th, 2010 at 8:22 am
    An undercount in a red state can benefit the party responsible for The Census.)

    Responsible yes; totally at fault no. The headache started in the 2006 time frame with the Harris contract. As to which party benefits, they both will.

  6. Pablo S. Says:

    Not sure how you figure a red state would benefit from reduced representation???
    It is clear to me how a lack of intervention from the current Administration — and thus allowing an undercount in a red state — would benefit the current administration.