My Two Census

Formerly the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 US Census, and currently an opinion blog that covers all things political, media, foreign policy, globalization, and culture…but sometimes returning to its census/demographics roots.

Census Countdown Brings Fear of Exclusion

An article in today’s Wall Street Journal continues to highlight concerns that the 2010 Census is not getting an accurate count of all US residents.

“HIDALGO, Texas—As census takers wrap up door-to-door counting, community organizers in hard-to-count areas are worried that some of their residents will be missed, again.

Interest in the 2010 population count—used to distribute federal funds and assign House seats during redistricting—has surged across the U.S., with some 250,000 community groups signing up to help in hopes of a more accurate count than in previous decades.

But even with their input, leaders in many communities remain doubtful about the census results.

“I’m just not confident that we’re going to have a 100% accurate count,” said Judge Rene Ramirez, Hidalgo county’s top administrator.”

These concerns are not trivial and an undercount will have very real financial consequences for rural areas that have already been hit hard by the recent recession.  Data from the 2010 census is used to allocate federal funding and Hidalgo county officials point to the results of an undercount in the 2000 census.

“Hidalgo has already lived through the consequences of an undercount. The 2000 Census underestimated its population by 1.8% or 13,902 inhabitants, resulting in a loss of $51.6 million in government funds including Medicaid, foster care and vocational education, according to a study commissioned by a board created by Congress.”

Mytwocensus.com has documented other instances where the 2010 Census has failed to get an accurate count of residents.  One case was in West Texas, the other instance was in New York City.  These concerns have not been addressed in a satisfactory manner by Census officials and we feel this is unacceptable.

Comments are closed.