My Two Census

Formerly the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 US Census, and currently an opinion blog that covers all things political, media, foreign policy, globalization, and culture…but sometimes returning to its census/demographics roots.

Census Bureau Press Release: Nation Achieves 74 Percent Final Mail Participation in 2010 Census

Editor’s Note: The Census Bureau spent $340 million on ads for the 2010 Census…way more than it spent in 2000, while it achieved the same response rate.

Here’s the press release:

The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that 74 percent of households in the United States filled out and mailed back their 2010 Census questionnaire, matching the final mail participation rate achieved in the 2000 Census. Twenty-two states, 1,553 counties, and 278 cities and townships with a population of 50,000 or more met or exceeded their 2000 Census participation rates. The District of Columbia and Puerto Rico also met or exceeded their rates.

The final 74 percent mail participation rate includes an additional 2 percent of households that mailed back their forms after April 27, when the U.S. Census Bureau announced a 72 percent participation rate. While these forms were received too late to prevent a visit by a census taker, they were included in the final tally. “We are very pleased with the public’s response to the 2010 Census, and these results demonstrate that the public stepped up to be counted,” Census Bureau Director Robert Groves said.

Approximately 47 million households that did not mail back a census form by the deadline were visited by census takers in person as part of a series
of operations and methods to ensure as complete a count as possible. The Census Bureau either received a form or attempted repeated visits to 100
percent of the identified housing units in the country. “As the law requires, we look forward to reporting to the nation by Dec. 31 the national and state populations as well as the allocation of seats to each state in the U.S. House of Representatives,” Groves said.
The final mail participation rates for the nation, states, counties, cities, towns and even the neighborhood level can now be found on the 2010 Census website (http://2010.census.gov/2010census/take10map/2010textview.php).

Below are final mail participation results from the 20 largest cities nationwide based on 2008 population estimates.

Highest Mail Participation Rates: Cities with Populations Over 100,000

Cities                   Percent
Livonia, Mich.             88
Rochester, Minn.           83
Centennial, Colo.          83
Sterling Heights, Mich.       83
Naperville, Ill.           83
Olathe, Kan.               82
Arvada, Colo.              82
Cary, N.C.                 82
Hialeah, Fla.              82
Madison, Wis.              82
Thousand Oaks, Calif.         81
Warren, Mich.              81
Overland Park, Kan.           81
Boise, Idaho               81
Billings, Mont.            80
Ann Arbor, Mich.           80
Independence, Mo.          80
Sioux Falls, S.D.          80
Chesapeake, Va.            80
Lincoln, Neb.              80

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

5 Responses to “Census Bureau Press Release: Nation Achieves 74 Percent Final Mail Participation in 2010 Census”

  1. Mary Says:

    Can someone add some more context to the challenges faced this year? SRM is missing something.

  2. Anon Says:

    I agree!

    This popped into my reader today (http://www.civilrights.org/archives/2010/10/1081-census.html):

    “The final 2010 census participation rate, which reflected a two percent increase over the preliminary participation rate announced on April 27, is remarkable given the challenges facing the 2010 census, including:

    - a larger, more diverse, and more mobile population;

    - the displacement of thousands by natural (Hurricanes Katrina and Rita) and human-made (foreclosures) disasters;

    - increased concerns about privacy and confidentiality in a post 9/11 environment;

    - the potential chilling effect of anti-immigrant policies;

    - and, most recently, a severe economic recession.”

  3. anon Says:

    Mary, I think the moderator is sleeping. Here is the full story that I posted last night. I added some bold to call out the challenges you asked for.

    Final Census Participation Rate Matches 2000 Census Rate
    October 22, 2010 – Posted by Tyler Lewis

    The Census Bureau reported today that 74 percent of households completed their census forms and mailed them back, matching the final participation rate of the 2000 census.

    The final 2010 census participation rate, which reflected a two percent increase over the preliminary participation rate announced on April 27, is remarkable given the challenges facing the 2010 census, including:

    - a larger, more diverse, and more mobile population;
    – the displacement of thousands by natural (Hurricanes Katrina and Rita) and human-made (foreclosures) disasters;
    – increased concerns about privacy and confidentiality in a post 9/11 environment;
    – the potential chilling effect of anti-immigrant policies;
    – and, most recently, a severe economic recession.

    Civil and human rights groups were concerned that these challenges would result in an inaccurate count that adversely affects hard-to-count minority and low-income communities. In response, many groups became Census Bureau partners and worked to reassure the public that census information is confidential, helped communities learn how to avoid possible fraud, and provided multiple resources in a variety of languages to help individuals understand how to complete the form.

    In addition, The Leadership Conference Education Fund launched a campaign with four national civil rights organizations and local community-based organizations to encourage census participation among hard-to-count populations in 13 key areas around the country.

    The Census Bureau is currently verifying all the data it collected during the enumeration. It will report the official national and state population counts, which are used to apportion seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, by the end of this year.

  4. Al Forteni Says:

    anon, given all the challenges and keeping in mind there were challenges during the 2000 census and also, given that the 2010 Census spent significantly more than the 2000 Census, can we really say the 2010 resulted in a better mail in response than 2000? I think all of the results are not in and it will be sometime before success of the 2010 can be meassured. The above contains what I consider excuses for the not so stellar response rate.

  5. N if for knowledge Says:

    WhoHooh Lincoln!