My Two Census

Formerly the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 US Census, and currently an opinion blog that covers all things political, media, foreign policy, globalization, and culture…but sometimes returning to its census/demographics roots.

Posts Tagged ‘Blog’

Check out the Census Bureau’s Global Reach Blog

Monday, February 17th, 2014

This blog that the Census Bureau runs on global trade, called the Global Reach blog, is actually pretty awesome. Check it out some time!

The Census Bureau just launched its own official blog…

Friday, September 24th, 2010

It’s called Random Samplings. Check it out HERE.

After two weeks without blogging…Robert M. Groves is back

Wednesday, June 9th, 2010

Census Bureau Director Dr. Robert M. Groves hasn’t been blogging for two weeks. We suspect that this is to avoid all of the problems that have consistently come up surrounding the 2010 Census. You would think that he would use his blog to debunk criticism, but since he hasn’t we will have to assume that there is a significant amount of truth in what has been reported on MyTwoCensus.com. However, yesterday Dr. Groves (or a PR lackey on his behalf) posted again:

We’ve finished the fifth week of the Nonresponse Followup stage of the 2010 Census.

The completion of interviews in this phase is proceeding roughly on schedule. As of Sunday, we completed over 84% of the entire workload.

Some local census offices, those with smaller than expected workloads are entering the final phases of their nonresponse followup workload.

We are now engaged in a variety of quality control procedures. We redo a portion of each enumerator’s work, to gain some assurance that our data quality standards are being maintained. Then we will launch an operation that verifies that cases that the enumerator has recorded as vacant on April 1, were correctly categorized. I’ll say more about our quality assurance procedures in another entry.

Despite social media directive, blogs survive…

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

Despite the Census Bureau’s directive that Census Bureau employees keep their traps shut, some Census Bureau critics survive, albeit few. If you know of other blogs out there beyond these, let us know:

http://crewleader-handholder.blogspot.com/

http://loosefemme.wordpress.com/

Social networking is bad! (says the Census Bureau)

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010
An anonymous Census employee sent SRM a tip about a few flyers the Bureau sent along with their paychecks (finally). One flyer covered driving safety (and please, everyone, do take care while driving). The other covered the ethics of social networking, and unfortunately it came to the conclusion that it’s bad. Sorry Morse, time to close up shop! (Note: That was a joke.)
Email excerpt:
It’s funny how it is implied that criticizing and talking to outsiders about the incompetence of the census machinery and brass is punishable with jail and fines, when in reality, it only applies to title 13 of USC in regard to respondent information and personally identifiable information.  The census own manuals have a section devoted to the rights and protections afforded to whistleblowers.  They also imply that because we are paid government employees, that it is unethical for us to publicly humiliate and or expose the ineptness of our employers.  Nice try.  There is no law preventing anyone from writing in their personal capacity, but it is implied that it is wrong, unethical, and just not cool.
And from the reminder itself (no emphasis added):
CONFIDENTIALITY AND ETHICS REMINDER
Social Networking and Census Employment
As personal blogging, tweeting, social networking sites have become more common and popular, it
is not unusual for Federal employees to have an opportunity to write about their work and their
employer in a public forum.  Please be aware you cannot disclose any nonpublic information that
is protected by statute.  You also cannot receive payments for writing about Census programs or
operations or about assignments you have been given as a Census employee.  In addition, you
must be careful to ensure that there is no appearance created that you are writing on behalf of the
Bureau of the Census, the Department of Commerce, or the United States Government when you
are writing in your personal capacity.
[...]
These restrictions on writing and publications are in addition to the life-time oath you took to
uphold the confidentiality of census information.  Any wrongful disclosure of confidential census
information subjects you to a fine up to $250,000, imprisonment up to five years, or both.

MyTwoCensus has some competition in the blogosphere…

Friday, March 26th, 2010

Census Bureau Director Robert M. Groves has been blogging more frequently as of late. However, from the syntax of the blog, we suspect that this is really being written by a PR team…Check out the “Director’s Blog” HERE.

Reading between the lines: The Census Project is in bed with the Annie E. Casey Foundation

Friday, April 24th, 2009

Last night, The Wall Street Journal published a blog post by June Kronholz about the likelihood of being counted in the 2010 Census. As the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 Census, MyTwoCensus must point out that this article is written from a very partisan perspective. Kronholz’s only source of data was information collected by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and released by The Census Project. Kronholz writes, “The [census counting] estimates were developed by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, using Census Bureau planning databases, and released by the Census Project whose members include policy planners, demographers and citizen-rights advocates.”

If you look at The Census Project’s stakeholder list, it’s clear that all of the stakeholders are liberal advocacy groups, and more importantly, one of the “stakeholders” (which translates to meaning an organization that funds The Census Project) is The Annie E. Casey Foundation, the very organization responsible for providing this data…So here’s our advice when reading articles, even from reputable news sources:

1. Read between the lines.

2. Take any information from “The Census Project” with a large grain of salt, as it’s coming from many partisan sources including ACORN, the NAACP, the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, and other immigrant advocacy groups.