My Two Census

Formerly the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 US Census, and currently an opinion blog that covers all things political, media, foreign policy, globalization, and culture…but sometimes returning to its census/demographics roots.

Posts Tagged ‘door to door’

Robert M. Groves to update the media today…

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010

Of course the PR and spin forces will be at work, but hopefully the media does its best to fight them…please leave your questions for Dr. Groves in the comments section. I will live-blog this event later today:

NewswireToday – /newswire/ – Washington, DC, United States, 06/01/2010 – U.S Census Bureau Director Robert M. Groves will brief the media on the status of 2010 Census operations.

What:
U.S. Census Bureau Director Robert M. Groves will brief the media on the status of 2010 Census operations. One month into the door-to-door follow-up phase of operations, Groves will provide updates on America’s progress in responding to the 2010 Census. He will offer his views on where we are in the process and look ahead to future field operations. The briefing will include a media question-and-answer session.

When:
Wednesday, June 2, noon to 1 pm (EDT)

Who:
Robert M. Groves, director, U.S. Census Bureau
Fernando E. Armstrong, regional director, Philadelphia Regional Office

Where:
National Press Club, 13th floor
Holeman Lounge
529 14th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20045

Teens answering the door for 2010 Census enumerators

Monday, May 31st, 2010

MyTwoCensus has received a number of angry complaints from readers’ whose kids, in their teens, have completed their 2010 Census forms on behalf of their parents when enumerators come to the door. In Colorado, the media has picked up on this as well:

Watch the video HERE…

It started with a knock at the door, only April Stark says she never knew it.
She was in the lower level of her house and says she came upstairs to find her son Zach talking to a stranger… who was asking about their family.
Zach says the U.S. Census worker asked if he could come inside which was a little unnerving.
Zach says, “I didn’t want to let him in my house ever since my brother’s ipod was stolen by a guy that came to work for awhile in our house.”
Zach says he also was uncomfortable because he didn’t know the answers to all of the questions.
Zach says, “yeah… some of them I had no clue.”
The Starks don’t understand why the worker talked to Zach when he knew that April was home, too.
Zach says, “When I turned to go find my mom… he said, anyone 15 years and older can answer these questions so you can just stay here and answer them.”
April says, “He informed me that he was doing nothing wrong and that he was legally allowed by the Census Bureau to ask anyone over 15 these questions.”
April says she later called the local Census office and workers were sympathetic, but said the rules are the rules. Anyone 15 and older is considered qualified to answer questions of the household.
Deb Muehleisen, a partnership specialist with the Denver Regional Census Center says the census taker made some mistakes.
Deb says, “I would have felt the same way to find a stranger sitting in my living room with my child there so that was inappropriate of that census taker to ask to come inside.”
Muehleisen says the policy of questioning teens was decided by Census officials in Washington.
She adds, “I can share that concern with our team. As a matter of fact, I’m having a regional meeting on Monday and I’m happy to share that concern.”
April says she’s making a point to tell friends and family about what happened…hoping the word will get back to Uncle Sam so ten years from now… young teens can’t be targeted just adults.
We’re told the last day for census takers to be going door to door is July 10th.
Officials say the local office has completed about 50% of its work.

Bob Barr claims Census workers can enter your home when you’re not around.

Friday, May 28th, 2010

This appears to be idiotic, plain and simple. Yet this Bob Barr fellow who is a former Congressman and now writes for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution seems to believe what he’s writing, and he’s got a lot of comments in his comments section. However, it doesn’t make sense that someone looking to enumerate would want to visit an EMPTY household:

Census workers can enter your apartment in your absence

6:00 am May 26, 2010, by Bob Barr

Thousands of census workers, including many temporary employees, are fanning out across America to gather information on the citizenry.  This is a process that takes place not only every decade in order to complete the constitutionally-mandated census; but also as part of the continuing “American Community Survey” conducted by the Census Bureau on a regular basis year in and year out.

What many Americans don’t realize, is that census workers — from the head of the Bureau and the Secretary of Commerce (its parent agency) down to the lowliest and newest Census employee — are empowered under federal law to actually demand access to any apartment or any other type of home or room that is rented out, in order to count persons in the abode and for “the collection of statistics.”  If the landlord of such apartment or other  leased premises refuses to grant the government worker access to your living quarters, whether you are present or not, the landlord can be fined $500.00.

That’s right — not only can citizens be fined if they fail to answer the increasingly intrusive questions asked of them by the federal government under the guise of simply counting the number of people in the country; but a landlord must give them access to your apartment whether you’re there or not, in order to gather whatever “statistics” the law permits.

In fact, some census workers apparently are going even further and demanding — and receiving — private cell phone numbers from landlords in order to call tenants and obtain information from them.  Isn’t it great to live in a “free” country?

Photo of the day: Census form’s blowing in the wind

Saturday, May 8th, 2010

Apologies for being MIA for the past 36 hours, but I was traveling and now I am back to MyTwoCensus work…Here’s a great photo:

2010 CENSUS— A faded bag with a census form hangs in front of a Talkeetna cabin. Enumerators now follow up and go door to door to count residents. Photo by Diana Haecker