My Two Census

Formerly the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 US Census, and currently an opinion blog that covers all things political, media, foreign policy, globalization, and culture…but sometimes returning to its census/demographics roots.

Posts Tagged ‘education’

More Americans with college degrees than ever before

Monday, February 27th, 2012

As GOP Presidential candidate Rick Santorum tries to appeal to voters by claiming that President Obama is a snob for proposing that all Americans should get a college education, he is apparently hitting home with the 70% of Americans who lack such a degree. Nonetheless, with more than 30% of Americans over the age of 25 now have a college degree, which is the highest percentage in American history. CNN explains it all right here.

Click here for the Census Bureau’s report on educational attainment in the United States.

Official Census Bureau “Participation Rate” Stats/Trends/Data Available Here

Thursday, April 29th, 2010

Check out this slideshow depicting recent data/trends that was shown at yesterday’s Census Bureau press conference (transcript of the press conference coming here ASAP).

Ed O’Keefe reports on Census Bureau’s final stats on mailback “participation” rates

Thursday, April 29th, 2010

H/t to Ed O’Keefe of The Washington Post:

72% of households responded to 2010 Census

Take a gander at the documents Groves shared with reporters at his announcement earlier today:

The 2010 Census response rate matched returns for the 2000 Census, the U.S. Census Bureau said Wednesday.

Seventy-two percent of American households returned questionnaires by last week and 28 states had higher response rates than 10 years ago. Seven of the 10 most populous counties matched their 2000 response rates as did eight of the 10 most populous cities, the Census Bureau said.

Census Director Robert Groves estimated that between 46 million and 49 million households did not return questionnaires. Temporary census takers hired by the agency will hit the streets starting this week and will visit those addresses up to six times to get answers. The agency will further outline those plans at a news conference Monday.

Groves said he anticipates critics will question why this year’s results only matched the 2000 response rates despite a multimillion-dollar advertising and outreach campaign, but he called this year’s results “unbelievable” because survey response rates have dropped significantly in the past decade.

Socioeconomic concerns rather than race or ethnicity appeared to drive lower response rates, Groves said. Less-educated, lower-income households appeared to respond less. The nation’s foreclosure crisis also contributed to the lower rates, he said.

The total cost of 2010 Census operations — budgeted for about $14 billion — will be known once officials get a complete tally of households that did not respond, Groves said.

To Steve Jost: This Is What You Can Learn From Guam

Thursday, February 18th, 2010

If American students had small  financial incentives to design posters (or YouTube videos), then perhaps participation rates for the 2010 Census would be higher…let’s take some lessons from our South Pacific cousin, Guam:

Source:  GuamPdm.com

The 2010 Guam Census is soliciting all Guam students to participate in a student poster competition to educate Guam residents about the upcoming Census. All public and private elementary and high schools are invited to participate from now through 5 p.m. March 12.

Students are encouraged to paint, draw and create a poster describing what the Census means to them and the community, according to a Census news release. The theme is “2010 Guam Census, It’s in Our Hands,” which must be incorporated in the 8-1/2 by 11-inch letter-size poster.

The first place winner will receive $250, second place $150, and third place $100, in each category. Winning entries will be used for advertising and promotional purposes, the release added.

Pick up entry forms at the local Census office, 770 East Sunset Blvd., Suite 280, Tiyan

Poll: Just 31 percent know census is required by law

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

A survey from the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press shows that Census Bureau still has a ways to go in educating U.S residents about the 2010 Census.

Though 90 percent of respondents said the census was very or somewhat important, the survey underscored the public’s lack of knowledge about the decennial count. Only 31 percent knew census participation is required by law. Answers about the census’ purpose fared somewhat better: 59 percent knew that the census is used to appropriate government funds and 64 percent knew the census determines congressional representation.

The survey comes as Bureau begins heavy promotion of the census: A $133-million advertising campaign began this week and a road tour was launched earlier this month.

The first stage of the ad campaign will focus on awareness and the Bureau has spent much time touting its outreach efforts — with nonprofits, minority groups and others. But it’s now evident that awareness about the census isn’t enough (84 percent of survey participants had heard of the census, and a full 92 percent were familiar with it after hearing a description) — education must be a key part of the marketing plans.

Perhaps owing to this lack of education, the poll also found that 18 percent of those surveyed may not participate in the 2010 Census. Ten percent said they might not fill out the form, 6 percent said they definitely or probably would not and 2 percent said they were unsure. Top reasons for not participating included a lack of interest or knowledge and a distrust of government.

Readers, what do you think: What’s the best way to educate the public about the cenus?

Census Education: Coming to a classroom near you!

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009

The U.S. Census Bureau has been making vast efforts to incorporate the 2010 Census education (click here for the Census Bureau’s official “Census in Schools” site!) into curriculum at grade schools across America.  For example, the New York State Teachers Union just released the following bulletin:

Free 2010 Census teaching tools and resource materials will be available to elementary, middle and high schools beginning in August, the U.S. Census Bureau announced.

The “2010 Census in Schools: It’s About Us” program was introduced to kindergarten through 12th grade principals in the United States, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Marianas Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in a letter in April.

The program is designed to provide students in grades K-12 with information about the importance of the 2010 Census.

The Census Bureau hopes students will share this information with their adult household members and they, in turn, will answer the census questionnaire.

The federal government conducts a census every 10 years to collect information about the people and housing of the United States.

The Census Bureau will send Census in Schools program brochures to all grade 9 through 12 principals, social studies department chairs and school service coordinators this summer.

The Census in Schools program will offer:

  • Age-specific educational materials, which include maps displaying population counts and other demographic information, and lesson plans grouped by grade and correlated to national standards for math, geography and language arts.
  • Kits for principals, containing maps, a program brochure, information about online lessons, mini-teaching guides and family take-home kits.
  • Online resources for teachers, including lesson plans, family take-home kits, event ideas and census data to teach students and their families about the census’ role in American history, current events and more.

The interactive, user-friendly Census in Schools Web site features memory games, word finds, state facts, coloring pages and research project ideas.

All “2010 Census in Schools: It’s All About Us” program materials will be available online for educators, students, parents and the public in August.