My Two Census

Formerly the non-partisan watchdog of the 2010 US Census, and currently an opinion blog that covers all things political, media, foreign policy, globalization, and culture…but sometimes returning to its census/demographics roots.

Posts Tagged ‘enumerators’

Census Bureau creates a new operation (late in the game)

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010

For the past week, MyTwoCensus has received reports that the Census Bureau is undergoing some NEW unscheduled/unplanned operations. The question now is WHY? Was the previous data poor?

Here’s an e-mail that was recently sent to 2010 Census managers:

From:
FLD Decennial Data Collection

To:

FLD Regional Directors, FLD Deputy Regional Directors List, FLD ARCM, FLD 2010 Regional Offices List, TMO Decennial Operations Technical Support 2010/BOC@BOC, FLD Decennial Assistant Division Chiefs List, FLD Decennial Branch Chiefs

Cc:

mtrocki@oig.doc.govfmeny@oig.doc.gov, Fay F Nash/DMD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Barbara H Campbell/DSCMO/HQ/BOC@BOC, Barbara J Biebl/DACMO/HQ/BOC@BOC, Darlene L Monaco/DMD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Susanna J Winder/DMD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Shelley A Walker/DMD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Hilda S Dimmock/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Ellen W Cafarella/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Lucia J Chavez/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Rodney Peter De Peiza/DACMO/HQ/BOC@BOC, Annetta Clark Smith/DMD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Nancy E Kolkebeck/PHRCC/BOC@BOC, PHRCC Area Managers List@BOC, Patricia A Boykin/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Eric L Cheevers/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Julia A Shaw/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC, FLD Decennial Data Collection@BOC, Irvin Vann/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Kimberly L Canada/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Craig D Ostrom/DACMO/HQ/BOC@BOC, kamro@ics-nett.com, Andrew G Knaster/DACMO/HQ/BOC@BOC, Sarah K Heimel/DSSD/HQ/BOC@BOC, Geoffrey I Jackson/DSSD/HQ/BOC@BOC, William H Johnson Jr/FLD/HQ/BOC@BOC

Date:

07/30/2010 02:11 PM

Subject:

2010 NRFU NRFU Residual Follow-up Ops Log – July 30, 2010

Sent by:

Hilda S Dimmock

ACTION:  July 30, 2010  NRFU Residual Follow-up Ops Log
Regional Census Centers should share the appropriate portions of information in this Ops Log with their LCOs

This is the first Ops Log related to the recently added NRFU Residual Follow-up Operation.  The operation universe, rules and procedures are in the final approval stage, but we are providing the following  field dates to aid in planning:

  • 8/11 Scheduled release of PBOCS for NRFU RES for Assignment Prep
  • 8/12 Begin Field enumeration
  • 8/21 Begin Final Attempt for cases
  • 8/24 End of field enumeration
  • 8/25 All EQs MUST be shipped to the data capture centers

Highlights of the operations are as follows:

  • Training will be similar to VDC in that we will provide a Job Aid for Enumerators, Crew Leaders/Field Operations Supervisors and NRFU Residual section for the Office Manual.
  • We will provide information on the size of the universe by early next week.
  • Assignment Preparation will very similar to NRFU VDC.
  • Field staff active in NRFU VDC will be available in NRFU Res.
  • Enumerators should be encouraged to get as many accurate interviews as possible during the short enumeration period based on the status of the address as of April 1, 2010.   What this means is that they should visit during the best time to catch the occupants at home and to continue to contact every address in their assignment before going back for the second or third attempt.
  • There will be no added HU during the operation.
  • There will be no RI attempts during the operation.
  • The Operation will use Operation Code ’91′ and Task code ’091′ for payroll

——————————————————————————-
> Please reply directly to “FLD Decennial Data Collection”

Monday Mailbag: Why aren’t enumerators who are let go being given this paperwork?

Monday, June 21st, 2010

Subject: Why Aren’t All Enumerators Being Given This Paperwork?

Message Body:
When I separated from the Census I was given my SP-50 along with this paperwork ( http://www.docstoc.com/docs/44201134/Census-Separation-Paperwork) which includes a form that advises me that I may be eligible for Federal Unemployment.  This is of interest to me since I’d already run out of EDD extensions when I began working for the Census.  When I visited the EDD website I learned that there was indeed Federal Unemployment Insurance money that is seemingly just for people who were recently separated from the military or some other branch of the Federal Government.  To apply for EDD under these circumstances one must fill out a supplemental Federal form along with one’s regular Unemployment Application (http://www.docstoc.com/docs/44200536/Unemployment-Claim-For-Federal-Employees).  The thing is I just spoke to two other enumerators who were recently separated from the Census and all they received was their SP-50s.  They did not get the additional paperwork I got.  Is the Los Angeles area Census attempting to keep Census workers from the knowledge that they are eligible for this type of unemployment?

Washington Post: Tales of abuse against census workers

Sunday, June 20th, 2010

Today, The Washington Post published a very detailed story about incidents involving census workers. Click HERE for the full article. Some highlights:

“So far, the Census Bureau has tallied 379 incidents involving assaults or threats on the nation’s 635,000 census workers, more than double the 181 recorded during the 2000 census. Weapons were used or threatened in a third of the cases.”

“Steven Jost, a spokesman for the Census Bureau, said it is unlikely that the policy prohibiting census workers from carrying weapons will be rescinded.”

“The number of verified incidents might go down after analysis.”

Did this happen in your office?

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

This comes from an anonymous tip:

Hi, the FOS told all the CL’s, CLA’s, and enumerators to bring EVERYTHING in this morning.  EVERYTHING.  Even eq’s / binders still in progress.  He said (talking about the LCO managers) “They said turn it all in this morning, they’ll finish the eq’s at the office.”

How are they going to “finish” the eq’s at the office?   They’re going to make stuff up, just like they did last year during mapping.   Fabricate the data, in order to meet the deadlines and make the LCOM and admins “look good”.

Ed O’Keefe: 113 attacks against Census Bureau employees

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

From Ed O’Keefe of The Washington Post:

More than 113 census takers have been the victims of assaults or attacks since April 1, the U.S. Census Bureau said late Wednesday.

In response to inquiries by Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.), Census Director Robert Groves said the bureau’s temporary workers knocking on doors to collect information have faced 29 threats involving a gun, four robberies and three instances of being held against their will or carjacked. Six workers died in car accidents and one was killed while off duty.

The Census Bureau hired about 635,000 people to follow up with people who did not return questionnaires by the end of April. The process is more than half completed, and is scheduled to continue into July.

Bureau officials did not return requests for comment Wednesday night and did not provide comparable figures from the 2000 Census. Twenty-one census workers died on the job between 1998 and 2009, according to agency figures.

Local news reports have revealed some of the incidents, including a census worker carjacked by a 14-year old and a California incident thatresulted in the death of a woman.

Aides said Maloney requested the information to determine whether news reports were accurately reflecting a trend or merely focusing on a few incidents.

“These acts of violence against census enumerators are tragic, especially when you consider these temporary workers were only trying to do their job making sure their neighbors are accurately and fairly counted in the Decennial Census,” Maloney said.

The attacks come as the agency announced stricter hiring rules on Wednesday after a registered sex offender using an alias got a job as a census taker.

MyTwoCensus Editorial: For the sake of employees, tell the truth about how long NRFU operations will last

Thursday, May 20th, 2010

MyTwoCensus has received confidential reports from multiple Census Bureau officials that non-response follow-up operations in many parts of the country are winding down. By law, the Census Bureau can only contact non-responders three times in person and three times by phone — even though MyTwoCensus is currently investigating whether additional illegal contacts are taking place.

Because of the Census Bureau’s computer failures, the 2010 Census may be coming in over-budget (apparently $15 billion wasn’t enough cash…). Since the Census Bureau doesn’t want to take yet another scolding from the Inspector General and the Government Accountability Office, they may try to abruptly end the 2010 headcount ASAP.

With half a million workers on the streets during this large-scale operation, there is significant amounts of confusion about how long jobs will last. Lying to Census Bureau employees, who very well may lose their jobs within the next one or two weeks (by the end of May) is not the answer. Yes, these jobs are temporary, but working through the end of July meant an additional two months of security and stability for many individuals employed by the Census Bureau who may have quit lower paying jobs to take on these positions. Additionally, it seems to be that thousands of individuals went off unemployment to take their Census Bureau jobs. These people should not have been told that they would have 6-8 weeks of work if they really only have 4 weeks of work.

Is speaking English a requirement to become a 2010 Census employee? Apparently not.

Monday, May 17th, 2010

The following report comes from San Antonio. Has anyone else experienced a 2010 Census worker who doesn’t speak English or is this an isolated case?

By Steve Lindscomb

SAN ANTONIO-Census workers are knocking on doors to get unanswered forms, but what would you do if that worker couldn’t speak your language? That’s what happened to one woman recently. When we first asked the Census Bureau about this incident that a viewer wrote us about, they found it hard to believe, but when we told them we ran into the very worker ourselves, and he really could not speak english, they had some questions to answer.

Sylvia Turner told us she was shocked. The census worker she talked to was very nice and courteous, but could not hardly put two or three english words together. “I tried, I stood there, I tried to be very patient and he could not speak one work clearly.”

She said she was surprised because she thought every census worker was tested for fluency in at least english. She didn’t want to get the worker in trouble, but somehow, the system broke down.

Her question was “are they speaking to these individuals or are they just taking applications.”

When we cruised around this north side neighborhood we happened to run into a census worker. And wouldn’t you know it…it had to be the same guy, because after talking to him for ten minutes, neither one of us knew what the other was trying to say. We didn’t want to embarrass him so we aren’t identifying him, but we did ask the census bureau if workers are tested and screened to communicate with the public.

A spokesperson would only read a statement to me over the phone. “While enumerators can take the skills test in Spanish, they must also then pass an English proficiency test. Enumerator training is conducted in English and, afterward, workers are observed and evaluated for English proficiency and their ability to conduct the survey. ”

The Census Bureau did tell us that if you run into a similar language problem, the worker has a form where you can indicate in which language you can answer questions. Another worker fluent in that language should come back to your house the next day.

New York Times Editorial Criticizes Census Bureau Hiring

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

The following New York Times editorial concerns the class action lawsuit that we reported on last week. For many months now, MyTwoCensus.com has criticized 2010 Census hiring practices. Here’s the editorial:

The Census Bureau is hiring a million or more people to assist with the 2010 count. It is temporary work, but it pays well. With national unemployment at nearly 10 percent, it looks like an excellent opportunity. That is unless you are one of the nearly 50 million Americans with any arrest or conviction on record.

A new class-action lawsuit has been filed on behalf of applicants who say they were unfairly turned down for census jobs based on an opaque screening policy that relies on F.B.I. checks for any criminal histories. Those checks are notoriously unreliable. A 2006 federal report found that half of them were inaccurate or out of date.

The Census Bureau is vague about what makes someone ineligible. In Congressional testimony, it suggested that it is excluding people who have been convicted of crimes involving violence and dishonesty. The bureau’s Web site seems to say that applicants whose background checks turn up any arrest — no matter how trivial, distant in time, irrelevant to the job — receive a letter advising them that they can remain eligible only if they produce “official court documentation” bearing on the case within 30 days. Incredibly, the letter does not identify the alleged criminal activity. Applicants must prove eligibility, even if they don’t know why they were flagged.

Official court records are often unobtainable for the millions of people whose convictions have been sealed or expunged or for people who have been arrested and released because of lack of evidence or mistaken arrest. This problem falls heaviest on black and Hispanic communities where stop-and-frisk policies and indiscriminate arrests are common.

The hiring problem is not limited to the Census Bureau. After 9/11, Congress required port workers to undergo F.B.I. background checks to keep their jobs. Last year, a study by the National Employment Law Project, an advocacy group for workers, found that the government had mistakenly denied credentials to tens of thousands of those workers.

States and cities are wisely revising employment policies. The federal government needs to develop a fair and transparent screening system for job applicants and a more effective appeals process. Congress must also require the F.B.I. to verify the criminal records — and find missing data before issuing background checks.

Two Female Census Bureau Employees Assaulted In Separate Incidents In Maine

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

There must be some major discontent against the Census Bureau in Maine, as Census Bureau employees faced angry citizens on at least two occasions in recent days.  (If you know of other incidents of assault or abuse against Census Bureau employees, please do not hesitate to let us know.) The following comes from the Maine Public Broadcasting Network:

Gov. John Baldacci today is encouraging Mainers to fill out and mail back their 2010 Census forms, as authorities look into the alleged assaults last week of two Census workers in the state.

Authorities told the Bangor Daily News that Wesley Storer, 61, of Bar Harbor is facing criminal retraint, assault and theft charges after tearing the ID badge off a 50-year-old female U.S. Census worker last Monday at an apartment building he owns in Harrington.

Storer then blocked the woman from leaving the building, Washington County Sheriff Department officials told the paper. Officials say Storer was intoxicated.

On Friday, a Brooksville man was charged with simple assault after he allegedly grabbed and pushed a 39-year-old female census worker who knocked on his door. Authorities say James Swift, 53, grabbed and pushed the woman after she tried to leave census papers on his doorknob. The worker did not require medical attention, the paper reports.

U.S. Census workers are currently gathering information for the once-in-a-decade survey of population trends. The incidents have prompted a warning to Census staff. “It has not changed protocol for us, but we have reiterated to our staff to use extreme caution,” says Terry Drake, the local census office manager based in Augusta.

Drake’s office is still hiring workers, and it’s too early to say whether the assaults will affect recruiting.  Drake says that the two workers who were assaulted are still on the job.

Urgent: Census Workers Lost…And Found

Friday, April 24th, 2009

After two Census Bureau employees went missing earlier today, one wonders: Why aren’t GPS systems installed in the handheld computers that all Census Bureau enumerators must carry? Why was there such a lack of communication between supervisors and their employees that the precise location of the employees could not be determined until many hours after they went missing and search efforts were underway from state police, firefighters, and troops?

The Chicago Tribune reported the following when the two employees were found:

STEPHENSON, Mich. – State police say two workers with the U.S. Census Bureau who were stranded on an isolated road in Menominee County have been found after an eight-hour search.

A news release from the Stephenson post said the women’s car got stuck Wednesday night on the seasonal road.

They called for help on a cell phone. But a poor connection prevented dispatchers from pinpointing the women’s location.

Troopers, volunteer firefighters and other law enforcement agencies helped with the search.

MyTwoCensus Exclusive Part 2: Identity Theft, Scams, and the Census Bureau

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

Vigilant Americans who are suspicious of individuals claiming to represent the Census Bureau have in many cases called the authorities. For instance,  NBC affiliate DFW in Richardson, Texas reports that residents were concerned about the legitimacy of census workers going to door to door, so they called the cops.

Part of the problem is that the Census Bureau doesn’t permit its employees to be photographed or videotaped while on the job, so residents would not know from other media reports what census enumerators wear or what their flimsy ID badges look like. In the opinion of MyTwoCensus, this ban on the media violates the first amendment that gives freedom to the press. It’s not like Census Bureau enumerators need their faces hidden for national security purposes like CIA Agents or FBI Agents would…Here’s the full story from Richardson, TX:

MyTwoCensus Exclusive: Identity Theft, Scams, and the Census Bureau

Tuesday, April 7th, 2009

censusscams

Thanks to reporter Larry Collins at NBC affiliate WCBD in Charleston, South Carolina for tipping us off to potential problems with sinister individuals posing as census enumerators. In the view of MyTwoCensus.com, the main problem here is that enumerators’ ID badges look unofficial, can be forged easily, and lack photo identification. Thus, since there are 1.4 million Americans who have been/will be hired to work as census takers, it’s highly likely that a workers’ badge has been/will be stolen or copied to use for criminal activities such as identity theft and fraud.

badge-hi

We’ve already sent our inquiries to the Census Bureau to find out they provide workers with ID badges that can be forged so easily…Don’t worry America, we’ll get to the bottom of this!